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Interview with Indigenous Advocate Richie Allan on Population Sustainability in Australia


In November 2016 I co-wrote an article for New Matilda exploring why it is important for those on the left to discuss population sustainability. Although the feedback was overwhelmingly positive, it was suggested that the debate is invalid unless it is inclusive of migrants or indigenous Australians. Which got me thinking …

SPA Submission to the Inquiry into the Australian Government’s role in the development of cities.

"As Sustainable Population Australia is an environmentally focused organization, we advocate policies that encourage human activity that is sustainable within finite natural limits and question the ongoing growth paradigm. Growth in the capital cities is reaching limits, whilst coastline development impacts fragile ecosystems. However, inland Australia is more subject to temperature extremes, water shortages and a lack of locational comparative advantage to sustain livelihoods. Within the context of an increasing climate emergency and peak fossil fuel energy, investment will be better spent on resilient communities and foreign aid rather than growth for growth's sake."

Is ‘POPULATION’ a dirty word in the sustainability movement in Australia?

Population is a big issue happening in the world today, with our numbers having increased massively from around 1 billion in 1850 to what now looks like 11 billion at the end of the century. Right now, the numbers of the world’s poor increase by 80 million each year and the number of unwanted pregnancies are 210 million per annum. Considering that human population predicts 88% of impact to other animal and plant species (according to the International Union for the Conversation of Nature) human population remains a huge, yet very controversial concern.

Account of Sustainable Population Forum hosted by David Feeney, Batman MP

Candobetter.net is pleased to publish Michael Bayliss's detailed account and innovative analysis of a population event that filled the Thornbury Theatre. Predictably, the official speakers were coy on the idea of population growth restraint in contrast with an audience keen to hear this addressed. Conversations from passionate members of the general community as well as the opportunity for members of the public to place the hard questions on panelists make events like this worthwhile attending. Unless one is prepared to stand up and question the experts eloquently, their business as usual paradigm will continue to be left unchecked, and the wider community needs to be shown that there are alternatives to the current paradigm that are both fair and make sense. It was perhaps telling that many of the Labor volunteers and staff at the event admitted to having never considered population issues before.

Collapse, conspiracies, and three ideas for environmentalists to genuinely save the planet

On Friday the 13th of February I attended the “Great Debate: To Collapse or Not to Collapse,” hosted by the Sustainable Living Festival at the Deakin Auditorium. The following Wednesday I attended a screening on the movie Cowspiracy, hosted by Animal Liberation Victoria, which explored the impact of industrial animal agriculture on the environment and the resistance from environmental groups to address the issue in a meaningful way.

Both events painted a grim picture of the environment and society if we don’t make considerable changes, however as in most events that prescribe change, they did a good job of focusing on particular issues whilst ignoring others. I have reflected considerably over the past week, and after summarising the two events I will share three points that I feel get overlooked by the environmental and social change movements. I believe these points must be acknowledged if we are to sustain the planet for successive generations.

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