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How to get more inspectors for animal welfare in local government

All councils in Victoria have the ability and the authority to elect at least one local laws officer to represent an inspector, as defined in the “Prevention of cruelty to animals act” (POCTA) under section 18 defined as a “general inspector”, warranted and authorized by” the minister of the time”, to enforce the POCTA as such. All it takes is the stroke of a pen.

There are 79 councils/shires in the state of Victoria . Each has in their employ at least two local laws officers and, in the larger towns there are up to 14 local laws officers on staff. For instance, Geelong, Bendigo, Ballarat, City of Casey (13),Sale, Bairnsdale, City of greater Shepparton and many many more all have at least 5.

It would be true to say that all councils in Victoria have the ability and the authority to elect at least one local laws officer to represent an inspector, as defined in the “Prevention of cruelty to animals act” under section 18 defined as a “general inspector”, warranted and authorized by” the minister of the time”, to enforce the POCTA as such.

All it takes is the stroke of a pen. So, if this was considered by council, Victoria would then have the luxury of an additional 150 + officers to work under POCTA and RSPCA would then have the assistance of all officers around this state and I am happy to inform all, at no expense to the state government. The duty of care and protection for all creatures would therefore not be the responsibility alone of a private charitable organisation(such as RSPCA) to enforce a government act of parliament.

Casey Council has 13 such officers authorised to enforce POCTA (Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act), and other Councils should now follow this example. Casey Council have used the new “puppy farm laws” and was the first to bring about a prosecution under this new law, with great success.

If all councils allowed this to happen it would certainly help solve the animal welfare crisis that is occurring in this state. We have the redundancy of hundreds of DEPI personnel and RSPCA always “bemoaning” no recourses no man power, no money”. Well, wouldn’t the proposal that we have suggested be a great gift to animal welfare?

To think of over an extra 200 authorised inspectors “out there” helping animals. Who knows, we could possibly see the “emergency animal ambulance” starting up again. The RSPCA no longer services this. Animals might actually be physically rescued by these inspectors instead of private and volunteered personnel doing the work. Even - God forbid - an afterhours emergency cruelty “call-out service”, as cruelty surely doesn’t stop at 5 o’clock.

Barrie Tapp . I care!Do YOU?

Comments

What a great idea and the $1million promised by opposition leader Daniel Andrews "if he wins the election" for a "flying squad for the RSPCA" (what baloney), well he can give that to local government to help them eh?