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Interview with Cristine Hong: What's happening on the Korean Peninsula

In this podcast interview inside, Christine Hong speaks about the Korean history not told in corporate media, present day moves towards peace on the peninsula, and more. The interview is by journalist Eva Bartlett.

https://soundcloud.com/eva-k-bartlett/interview-with-christine-hong-whats-happening-on-the-korean-peninsula

Christine Hong is an associate professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and an executive board member of the Korea Policy Institute. She has spent time in North Korea, including as part of a North American peace delegation.

She specializes in transnational Asian American, Korean diaspora, critical Pacific Rim, and comparative ethnic studies.

She is a board member of the Critical Ethnic Studies Association, an executive board member of the Korea Policy Institute, a coordinating committee member of the National Campaign to End the Korean War, and a member of the Working Group on Peace and Demilitarization in Asia and the Pacific.

Web Sites:

Korea Policy Institute
kpolicy.org/

National Campaign to End the Korean War
www.endthekoreanwar.org/

Working Group for Peace and Demilitarization in Asia and the Pacific
www.asiapacificinitiative.org/?doing_wp_…7021484375

Legacies of the Korean War
legaciesofthekoreanwar.org/

literature.ucsc.edu/faculty/singlet…&cruz_id=cjhong

Comments

The following was posted to Forget War: Containment is the Best Way to Deal With North Korea (27/6/2018) |The American conservative and is awaiting moderation.

Anyone who thinks about the issue for more than two minutes would realise that, unless the leadership of North Korea is suicidally insane, their nuclear weapons could not possibly pose a threat to the United States.

Given that the United States and its allies have vastly more nuclear and conventional weapons than does North Korea, any preemptive launch of nuclear weapons by North Korea would almost certainly cause their country to be devastated even more than it was between 1950 and 1953 (when, according to United States Air Force General Curtis Le May, 25% of North Korea's population died).

The only time the United States or its allies within South Korea need ever fear North Korean nuclear weapons would be during the course of an attack launched by them against North Korea.