You are here

Humanity's debt to JFK

Next Tuesday 22 November is the 48th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. The whole world is indebted to JFK more than to any other single individual in history for preserving the peace and, on no less than three occasions, preventing global nuclear holocaust. This was originally posted in response to an article Armistice Day of 18 November on johnquiggin.com.


Next Tuesday 22 November is the 48th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in 1963. The whole world is indebted to JFK more than to any other single individual in history for preserving the peace and, on no less than three occasions, preventing global nuclear holocaust. I think it is time we commemorated JFK’s selfless bravery and his sacrifice no less than we have just commemorated the bravery and sacrifice of tens of thousands of Australians who have fallen in the two World Wars and other wars of this and the last century.

It is most instructive to read President Kennedy’s speech to the American University on 10 June 1963, 5 months before his murder. Here are some excerpts:

“We do not need to jam foreign broadcasts out of fear our faith will be eroded.” (Contrast that to NATO’s jamming of radio broadcasts from Libya during its recent invasion.)

“Above all, while defending our own vital interests, nuclear powers must avert those confrontations which bring an adversary to a choice of either a humiliating retreat or a nuclear war. To adopt that kind of course in the nuclear age would be evidence only of the bankruptcy of our policy–or of a collective death-wish for the world.”

“World peace, like community peace, does not require that each man love his neighbor–it requires only that they live together in mutual tolerance, submitting their disputes to a just and peaceful settlement.”

“So, let us not be blind to our differences–but let us also direct attention to our common interests and to the means by which those differences can be resolved. And if we cannot end now our differences, at least we can help make the world safe for diversity. For, in the final analysis, our most basic common link is that we all inhabit this small planet. We all breathe the same air. We all cherish our children’s future. And we are all mortal.”

It is also most instructive to compare JFK’s words and actions with those of President Barack Obama and his unspeakable predecessor who, between them, have caused the deaths of hundreds of thousands and the devastation, so far, of Iraq, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Libya. Let’s hope Obama and his new Australian Deputy Sheriff can be stopped before they do the same to Syria, Iran and — who knows where else?

See also: The YouTube channel of Charles Ochelli, the Blind JFK researcher, James Corbett's interview with Charles Ochelli.

See also, before you respond to Jimmy Wales' appeal for funds: The WikiPedia Fraud parts 1, 2 and 3 on ctka.net . Jimmy Wales caught out covering up for the Warren Commission. (In spite of this unsavoury aspect of Wikipedia, I still find Wikipedia useful in many other ways. Nothing else of which I am aware comes close to it in terms of a comprehensive catalogue of important knowledge. Those, who make use of it, must bear in mind such instances when it has been found to have covered up information, when widespread knowledge of that information has been perceived to threaten powerful vested interests. - Ed)

AttachmentSize
Image icon jfk-tiny.jpg8.95 KB
Image icon jfk.jpg45.3 KB

Comments

I wonder if you know of Kennedy's last book, A Nation of Immigrants James?
It was published in 1958 then again posthumously, in 1964.

Ira Mehlman has written about the ideas in it and its reception in a fascinating article in "John F. Kennedy and Immigration Reform"The Social Contract, Volume 1, Number 4 (Summer 1991).

"What Kennedy clearly did not call for was a massive increase in the number of immigrants being admitted to the United States. He suggested a modest increase in the annual immigration quota that then stood at 156,700.3 There is, of course, a legitimate argument for some limitation upon immigration, wrote Kennedy. We no longer need settlers for virgin lands, and our economy is expanding more slowly than in the 19th and early 20th centuries."

Mehlman also writes,

"In the history of publishing it would be hard to find a book, published by a relatively small press and with almost no public notice, containing ideas that have had a greater and more long-lasting impact on public policy than John F. Kennedy's 1958 treatise, A Nation of Immigrants."

This awfully good letter came from the Age which overall supports and works with anti-democratic forces like the Committee of Melbourne, but sometimes they publish some good stuff from unpaid sources:

Challenge system

THE rise in lawlessness is the symptom rather than cause of Australia's democratic decline (Comment, 5/12). What Leslie Cannold identifies as a breach of the rules is rather the substitution of new rules following bipartisan ''reinvention of government'' in the image and service of the market.

The values of economic rationalism and managerialism have replaced those of participatory democracy. If citizens are recast as consumers, their essential services sold off, government contracts sealed under ''commercial-in-confidence'' and data on failed public-private partnerships quarantined, what hope is there for public engagement and scrutiny? If the convergent alternative parties are contemptuous of their declining membership, and run by bovver boys who preselect from their own ranks, isn't lawlessness inevitable? All power to the independent MPs bravely and effectively challenging those who enable corporations to rule the world.

Angela Munro, Carlton North
Read more at http://www.theage.com.au/national/letters/lobby-needs-to-find-conscience-20111206-1oh5i.html#ixzz1foVJMU5F