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Kangaroo & Wombat Workshop funding arrangements fall short - Can you help?

Michelle Thomson, of Animalia, is hosting two wildlife care workshops with Linda "Indi" Dennis: one is on kangaroos and the other is on wombats. The workshops teach how to care for Kangaroos, Wallabies, and other Macropods and for wombats. Linda "Indi" Dennis is a well known wildlife carer,educator and advocate for our wildlife. By the way, Animalia, which operates on a shoestring, has advance-funded this workshop and now a major funding source has fallen through. The Animal Shelter may have to close if no fresh funds come in; the situation is actually desperate. Please consider donating to Animalia if you cannot attend the workshop. There are more and more injured animals as human population expands, and not enough qualified carers. Workshops that actually train new carers are as rare as hens' teeth. Animalia takes this initiative time and time again. Please help keep this little ark afloat.

Wombats and humans working together to free survivors from flooded warrens

In Murraylands, South Australia, floods have trapped wombats in their warrens for weeks. Wildlife rescuers have been rescuing them and, as they rescue them, the rescued animals have been digging their friends and relatives out alongside the human rescuers.
Wombats are indeed amazing creatures. See also "The strange and unforgivable decline in wombat appreciation in the 20th century."

News from Wildlife Sanctuary: Recovery is slow but sure after Victorian Bushfires last year

In the aftermath of the Black Saturday Victorian bushfires of 2008, Stella and Alan Reid picked themselves up from the ashes of everything they had lost - especially the native animals they had rehabilitated and released on their property. Almost a year has passed and they are beginning to heal and rebuild their lives and starting over with a new better Wildhaven. The photos clearly show that the animals who somehow survived are deeply grateful for their second chance....

Secretary of Treasury sounds alarm on Australia's overpopulation

Are Australia’s natural resource endowments, including water, capable of sustaining a population of 35 million? What are the implications for environmental amenity of this sort of population growth? Must it mean an even greater loss of biodiversity difficult as that might be to imagine, given our history of species extermination?" "In the last decade, permits have been issued to allow the commercial slaughter of 49.6 million kangaroos primarily to give household pets a bit of variety in their diet."
(Australian Secretary of Treasury, Ken Henry, Yesterday, 22 October 2009) Listen to audio on ABC radio.

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