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Banks Are Becoming Obsolete in China—Could the U.S. Be Next?

The U.S. credit card system siphons off excessive amounts of money from merchants. In a typical $100 credit card purchase, only $97.25 goes to the seller. The rest goes to banks and processors. But who can compete with Visa and MasterCard? It seems China’s new mobile payment ecosystems can. According to a May 2018 article in Bloomberg titled “Why China’s Payment Apps Give U.S. Bankers Nightmares”:

Meat eating - consuming our Planet


Environmentalists say the world is on the brink of a new era of food scarcity driven by a "perfect storm" of climate change, water shortage and a rising population” says US analyst and author Lester Brown.
If crops wastefully fed to livestock are included, European countries have more than three times more food than they need, while the US has around four times more food than is needed, and up to three-quarters of the nutritional value is lost before it reaches people's mouths.
Meat consumption and the destruction of our planet - Image source

Ecuador’s Constitution Gives Rights to Mother Nature

In September 2008 Ecuador became the first country in the world to declare constitutional rights to nature, thus codifying a new system of environmental protection. How about it, Australia?

Innocence Abroad in Peru can be dangerous and costly, even fatal!


On August 11 twelve Australians were on board a small cruise ship robbed by pirates on the Amazon River.
A very similar attack occured the week before on the same cruise ship, but they were unaware.

Globalisation of Victoria's water supplies will be funded by the users, Victoria's citizens.


Multinational company Suez Environnement estimates the Victorian desal plant will generate more than $2 billion in revenue over the next 30 years. With GDF Suez’ existing record of environmental destruction in the Amazon, their submission to build Wonthaggi's desalination plant should be dismissed.

Security forces kill at least 31 indigenous Peruvians protecting rainforest

The local indigenous population is upset at Government plans to open up much of the land in Peru's Amazonia region to oil and gas and to mineral exploration, even though much of the land is officially protected.

See also: "Thousands of indigenous Peruvians protest invasion of Amazon by oil, mining and agricultural companies" of 1 Jun 09, Resource boom threatens indigenous people, EcoEarth newsdesk.

Thousands of indigenous Peruvians protest invasion of Amazon by oil, mining and agricultural companies

For the past 40 days, indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon are protesting investment laws passed under a free-trade pact with the United States and against concessions granted to foreign energy companies. Indigenous communities complain that some 70% of Peruvian Amazon territory is now leased for oil and gas exploration, putting at risk their own lives and the biodiversity of the Amazon.

See also: Action Alert: Resource Boom in Peru's Amazon Threatens Indigenous Peoples' Livelihoods and Their Rainforest Homes"

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