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wildlife corridor

Video: Koala Accident Investigation - Update on Sean the Koala

Today at the Australian Wildlife Protection Council AGM I interviewed Craig Thomson, Animalia wildlife carer, about the events that may have led to Sean the Koala travelling down a busy highway in Langwarrin. Turns out he was probably following a traditional migratory route of male koalas in search of romance, which takes them from islands of habitat like the Cranbourne Botanical Gardens, down four-lane highways towards The Pines Flora and Fauna Reserve in Frankston, or further south, across the massive Peninsula Link tollway that cuts the Peninsula in half. Why are koalas being forced onto highways? It is another terrible cost of the unwanted human population expansion that is being forced on Victorians by the State Government, in its bid to grow Melbourne faster and faster. Animalia has $10,000 outstanding power bills; you can help by donating to WESTPAC BANK BSB 033138 Account 434072

Whittling away of green wedge in Frankston threatens wildlife

Submission against 11.8 Request for Planning Scheme Amendment Stotts Lane.
by Craig Thomson, wildlife carer
The proposed Amendment seeks to rezone the land from RCZ3 (Rural Conservation Zone Schedule 3) to Neighbourhood Residential Zone, include the site within the Urban Growth Boundary (UGB), remove the Green Wedge and apply a Development Plan Overlay (DPO) to the site. These changes also require consequential changes to the Land Use Framework Plan and the Housing Framework Plan in the Municipal Strategic Statement (MSS).

Private trust land set aside for koala comeback by James Fitzgerald in A.C.T. - video

For all you depressed wildlife battlers out there, here is a truly 'good news' koala story about a wildlife warrior hero, James Fitzgerald, who has placed nearly 800ha of what looks like good sub-alpine land in trust for koalas. Even better, the koala population there turns out to have strong new genetic properties and is chlamydia free!

Our crime? Anthropocentrism. Who pays? Koalas.

NSW Department of Health has approval to build a $2.5 million health centre for South Tweed Coast residents in Pottsville. Locals are currently on a waiting list to see a doctor so the need is urgent. The only problem is a critical koala food tree has been in the way of their planned parking lot. Tweed Coast koalas (with less than 144 remaining) are predicted to become locally extinct within 5 years due to developments taking up koala real estate. The question is: are koalas more important or are people more important? Or can people co-exist with koalas in the suburbs? In this case, sadly the koalas lost out .... once again.

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