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Flinders University Media Release - Campaign to reduce liver disease deaths

Life-threatening liver disease is skyrocketing in Australia, with alcohol and hepatitis C and now obesity-related fatty liver disease on the rise. The average age of death of these patients is in their mid-50s. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects one in four Australian adults and has been increasing in parallel with the rising prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the community. It is argued that some simple measures, including regular contact with specially trained nurses, can greatly improve outcomes for this chronic condition, which sometimes is poorly understood and mismanaged by patients and their medical and nursing systems. This article comes from a press release from Flinders University, but candobetter.net has included a video about the effects of commercial quantities of fructose on the liver, from Dr Lustig, of the University of California. We spoke to Associate Professor Alan Wigg, Flinders University College of Medicine and Public Health and Head of Hepatology and the Liver Transplantation Medicine Unit, Flinders Medical Centre, who agreed that fructose has a role in the cause of fatty liver. He says that this Flinders University study is particularly looking at how to help people whose liver disease has progressed to an advanced stage.

Fatpocalypse: Is rising obesity contributing to America’s poor Olympic performance?

The article by Robert Bridge, quoted and linked to inside, speculates on obesity being a factor in the United States' poor performance in the PyeongChang olympic games. It includes a graph of order of obesity in OECD countries. Australia is the fifth highest obesity country. Japan is the lowest. My money is on high fructose additions to our diets, such as corn-syrup. Dr Lustig University of California San Francisco, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, has been putting this message out for some time in fascinating scientific videos, including, "Fat Chance" and "The skinny on obesity." I have embedded "Fat chance" in the quoted material from the article inside.

A National emergency - Australian children are not well (Article by Sally Pepper)

I don’t have kids but I am disturbed about the Heart Foundation’s Active Healthy Kids very poor report card for Australian children last week. It said that Australian children are largely unfit because of a lack of exercise and that this deterioration has happened in the last couple of decades. Natasha Schranz author of the Foundation's inaugural report has graded Australian children at a disgraceful D minus. Contributing to this terrble score was a D for "active transport", meaning not nearly enough walking or bicycle riding to and from school.

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