You are here

fatty liver

New medical research on mechanism of fructose-induced liver disease in fat people

This medical research arises from the pandemic problem of fructose in our processed food, which is the major cause of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which accompanies the terrible scale of modern obesity. This hepatitis-related obesity carries high risks of dementia, cirrhosis, and cancer. The effects are similar to those of alcoholism, but awareness of risks is even lower. This study identifies fructose as doing its damage by causing changes to the barrier function of the intestine, which is a new understanding of how the liver-disease starts. The study proposes the idea that a genetic intervention might, at some time in the future, prevent these changes to some degree, in people very seriously affected. It points to genetic interventions in mice made ill by high fructose-induced diets. The authors of the study note that it would, of course, be better not to ingest the fructose. They do not go into the addictive nature of fructose, which helps sales-volumes and makes it very difficult for individuals to stop eating fructose-laden products. We have also embedded a video about fructose from the U of California.

Flinders University Media Release - Campaign to reduce liver disease deaths

Life-threatening liver disease is skyrocketing in Australia, with alcohol and hepatitis C and now obesity-related fatty liver disease on the rise. The average age of death of these patients is in their mid-50s. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects one in four Australian adults and has been increasing in parallel with the rising prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the community. It is argued that some simple measures, including regular contact with specially trained nurses, can greatly improve outcomes for this chronic condition, which sometimes is poorly understood and mismanaged by patients and their medical and nursing systems. This article comes from a press release from Flinders University, but candobetter.net has included a video about the effects of commercial quantities of fructose on the liver, from Dr Lustig, of the University of California. We spoke to Associate Professor Alan Wigg, Flinders University College of Medicine and Public Health and Head of Hepatology and the Liver Transplantation Medicine Unit, Flinders Medical Centre, who agreed that fructose has a role in the cause of fatty liver. He says that this Flinders University study is particularly looking at how to help people whose liver disease has progressed to an advanced stage.

Subscribe to RSS - fatty liver