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Plan Melbourne caves into a skyrocketing population: Hon Kelvin Thomson

PDF can be downloaded from Kelvin Thomson's web-site or here.
The Hon Kelvin Thomson MP
Federal Member for Wills
Tuesday 20th May 2014
MEDIA RELEASE
Melbourne's Skyrocketing Population

It is astonishing that the Victorian Government's latest Plan Melbourne now says Melbourne' s population will grow from 4.3 million now to 7.7 million by 2051.

Growth corridor woes

Government Growth Policy is not working – an example of one Growth Area municipality struggling under the financial burden of infinite population growth. Other growth corridors are also in stress.

Cardinia Shire is a largely rural municipality about 60 km from Melbourne. A government designated corridor of population growth and housing construction has been absorbing rapid population increase since 2003. The population is predicted to double over the next 10 years. Current Council records indicate that five families per day are moving into the corridor.

Snap protest at Carlton EW Link Drill Site Tomorrow

Despite the fact there are no publicly available plans for this project, Stage One of construction of the East West Link has already commenced with "geological investigation" (i.e. drilling for soil and rock samples and testing for underground water) along the proposed alignment of the above/under/on ground road way. As spelt out in the Eddington Review of 2008 the freeway/tollway is likely to be open cut through Royal Park. It seems that there has been a total failure to responsibly and democratically consult the Victorian Public on their wishes in this matter as it affects public lands. LOCATION: Meet near the reserve with the drilling rig at the corner of Neill and Canning Streets Carlton outside the Dan O’Connell Hotel starting at 12:30 pm. (Melways Map Reference 2BK4).

Bloating city, lost freedoms

My city's been assaulted by an enemy within, that eats away its organs and pushes out its skin

Good News! Fed Gov does not support Baylieu's East West Link

Good news! The Federal Budget did not provide funds to Premier Baillieu for the East West Link. Julianne Bell thanks those 16 community groups for supporting PPL VIC and the Royal Park Protection Group for Ian Hundley's and her mission to Canberra on 27 March 2012 to present their submission to Infrastructure Minister Albanese in which they requested the Federal Government NOT fund the EW Link but support public transport projects. Ian Hundley and Julianne briefed staff. Thanks also go to the Greens "for their principled stand against the East West Link and for their advocacy for Doncaster Rail Link."

Jill Quirk: Sustainable Population - deal or no deal?

This article title is based on the title of a debate at the Municipal Association of Victoria AGM, which took place on Thursday, October 21 at Hotel Sofitel. The article itself is based on speech notes from SPA Victoria's president, Jill Quirk, for her part in the debate. Panel members were: Jill Quirk, President of Sustainable Population Australia (Victorian branch); Pru Sanderson, CEO, VicUrban; and Professor of Physiology, Roger Short, Melbourne University. The Chair was Jon Faine.

High post-war immigration blamed for today's economic problems

A graph from "Australian Population Scenarios in the context of oil decline and global warming" at http://www.crudeoilpeak.com shows that the bulge in the Australian population pyramid which growth economists say will cause a larger number of aging people than the economy can cope with, was obviously caused by high levels of post-war immigration. Dr Jane O'Sullivan has quantified the enormous cost in new infrastructure and maintenance of population growth.

Biased Presentation of the Problems of Population Growth Without Questioning It in 'The Age'

Article in The Age(17/7/2009) 'Suburban sprawl costs billions more', presents the problems of population growth as creating urban sprawl that will cost $40 billion. It then highlights as a "solution", the idea that the density of the existing suburbs should be increased so Victoria can 'save itself' $40 billion. At no point is current population policy questioned or examined. It is simply accepted that population growth will be unstoppable. The article purpose appears to justify the need for increasing density as a "cheaper" solution for Melbourne's growth crisis, without of course calculating the cost, both direct economic cost and the loss of amenity for people already living in Melbourne.

Report on the Victorian Transport Infrastructure Conference

Full steam ahead. Vast increase in population and infrastructure. Vast decrease in democracy. There is no plan B. Minister Pallas assured the audience they would secure the necessary environmental approvals/considerations. The EES is not a yes or no process. International migration levels never seen before...address future labour force. Long term drivers - migration. Health infrastructure needed - maternity wards. Taxpayers to bail-out developers to continue even more malignant growth. Hastings doomed according to plan.

Government interference in Wimmera Mallee Water - some recent history

This document is republished to give background dating from 2003 as the Victorian government began to take control away from citizens and locals over water, land and government, and to assume more and more control, in public-private associations. It was the beginning of overt attempts to promote private profit from induced scarcity. The induced scarcity was created by the government policy to grow Victoria's population and economic activities. At the time few Victorians had the faintest idea of what was going on. I was one of few environmentalists to question the authority of the government's actions.

Politicians and their advisors must be made responsible for predictable catastrophes

Australian governments constantly pretend that no-one could see what was coming, but it was all eminently predictable and they had a hand in bringing about Australia's parlous and desperate ecological situation, simply by pushing population growth.

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